Oct
28
Sat
Hard Labor Creek Observatory Open House (website)
Oct 28 @ 7:30 pm – 9:30 pm
Oct
31
Tue
Halloween
Oct 31 all-day
Nov
5
Sun
Daylight Saving Time ends
Nov 5 all-day
Nov
7
Tue
Dr. Brant Johnson, Brookhaven National Laboratory (Host: M. Connors) @ NSC 218
Nov 7 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm

My First 25 Years in PHENIX at RHIC: From Small Science to Big Science

The PHENIX Collaboration at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) was formed in the Fall of 1991 through the joining of three smaller collaborations whose Letters of Intent had been rejected. Most of the PHENIX physicists came from the fields of nuclear and particle physics and from such smaller collaborations. I joined PHENIX in late 1992 after two decades of small-collaboration research in atomic, beam, and plasma physics. During the construction phase through 2000, I served as the RHIC Liaison for PHENIX and worked closely with RHIC and PHENIX Management to construct a large accelerator facility and its detectors. During the data-taking and analysis years of PHENIX, I became the Scientific Secretary of both the Institutional Board and Executive Council, the primary editor of the Bylaws and Publication Policies, the coordinator of publications, shifts, communications, and celebrations, plus the Manager of the PHENIX Office. In this colloquium I will give a general overview of the major scientific discoveries at RHIC, the challenges and rewards of large international collaboration, and my roles in the sociological evolution from small science to Big Science.

Nov
10
Fri
Veterans Day (observed)
Nov 10 all-day
Nov
11
Sat
Veterans Day
Nov 11 all-day
Nov
14
Tue
Dr. Danny Caballero, Michigan State Univ. @ NSC 218
Nov 14 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Nov
23
Thu
Thanksgiving Day
Nov 23 all-day
Nov
28
Tue
Dr. Nahum Arav, Virginia Tech (Host: M. Crenshaw) @ NSC 218
Nov 28 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm

HST/COS Observations of Quasar Outflows in the Extreme UV

Our ability to extract physical information from absorption spectra depends on the quantity
and quality of diagnostic troughs. There are many more diagnostic lines in the rest-frame
500–1050 °A that appear as absorption troughs in AGN outflows than there are at longer wavelengths. Especially diagnostics that can yield the distance of the outflows from the central source, and increasingly higher ionization species (Ovi, Ne viii, Na ix, Mg x and Si xii) that allow us to measure the dominant very-high-ionization phase of the outflow seen as “warm absorbers” in the X-ray spectra of nearby Seyfert outflows. In this talk I will show results from the first HST/COS program dedicated to observe quasar outflows at these rest wavelengths.

Dec
24
Sun
Christmas Eve
Dec 24 all-day